Blog: The Negotiation Edge

How To Recognize Weakness or Strength During Negotiations

Individual “signals” can be faked. “Signals” are choices of words, changes in tone of voice, body language changes (“flinches”) or things often referred to as “tells” .

So, you’re really looking to triangulate signals.

How To Disarm The Attack

There comes a time in almost every negotiation where we may get a counterpart that is trying to influence our decisions by making an ultimatum type offer (take X or this bad thing is going to happen to you).  Sometimes it may be something they say out of desperation, other times  they were going to hit you with it one way or another.  At the end of the day, everyone we meet in a negotiation has a plan of attack.  Even if you're only information going into an interaction is a cold read, you can start to draw lines between what they may want and why.  Usually the reasons for coming to the table that are more than what appears on the surface.  If you go into an interaction thinking the other side has only one reason for being there than you are sorely mistaken.  There are always things going on in the other side's position, the way they operate as a team or company that has brought them to the table.  If we take a real honest look at the reasons they would take a certain position, we can start to form a statement summary that defines their approach, consequently removing all the reasoning for cementing themselves over a certain point.

The Top 2 Reasons To Not Go First In A Negotiation

Here's the top 2 reasons not to go first in a negotiation. And they both leave money on the table.

How You Can Handle The #1 Most Common Lie in Negotiations

"Maybe"

I remember hearing a few years ago a businessman saying he started moving his business forward much more successfully when he started treating every “maybe” as if it were a “no”.

3 Ways To Make “No” Work For You

Is “Yes” really always “yes”?

“No” is protection. “Yes” is commitment. “No” instantly makes people feel safe while “Yes” makes them worry about what they’ve committed themselves to. Nearly every “Yes” at best is a conditional “yes” and often is a counterfeit “yes”.

The 1st Deadly Sin of Negotiation and How to Defeat It

The #1 Sin -  The Lust for “Yes”

Lust.  One of the 7 deadly sins of life and the first Deadly Sin of Negotiation.  It’s a powerful poison for a reason.  Lust is the dangerous alchemy of love and fear combined.  You love, yearn, crave something and at the same time you fear losing it so much you close your ears, eyes, and mind to everything that threatens it.

How to Get The Upper Hand In Any "Take It Or Leave It" Offer

A “take it or leave it offer” signals a great deal of insecurity on the part of the other side.  If they weren’t afraid to negotiate, they would.  They’re either afraid they might give in too much, or they’re under some external pressure that’s got them spooked. This gives you leverage.

What Makes You Think Your "Yes" Is Real?

 Yes is a very tricky concept, especially when put it into the negotiation context.  First of all, there are 3 types of “yes” – Confirmation, Commitment & Counterfeit – (the 3 ways to “C” yes) as it were.  Now while we do not ever advocate aiming for a “yes” or trying to force agreement through “yes”, there will be times when you have to deal with it.  Here are the two major ways to handle “yes”.

The 5 Critical Moments in a Negotiator’s Journey to Excellence

Do you want to make the transition to being an excellent negotiator? No matter where you are on the journey, here are 5 critical steps that you'll need to take along this path. 

The Alternative to "Tell Me More"

My last article in The Edge called “The Problem with Tell Me More” left a few people asking “What do you say instead?”.  This article is meant to give some insight on how to change your approach and make your communication efforts more influential.  You can also find out more about the ideas I am going to share here, in Chris’s book “Never Split the Difference” Chapter 7.